Proton Pump Inhibitors May Increase Risk of COVID-19

Proton Pump Inhibitors May Increase Risk of COVID-19

According to researches, patients who use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be exposed to a higher risk get COVID-19.

This new finding suggests that doctors should consider which patients need such powerful acid-lowering drugs, said professor of medicine, Brennan Spiegel.

Spiegel’s study was published on July 7 in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Although studies have not backed up many of the other concerns about conflicting reactions, they have shown that the drugs raise the risk for enteric infections, including those caused by SARS-CoV-1, a virus that is linked to the COVID-19 virus, SARS-CoV-2.

SARS-CoV-2 uses the angiotensin-converting enzyme–2 receptor to invade enterocytes. According to Spiegel’s theory, an increase in stomach pH above 3 as a result of the use of PPIs might enable the virus to access the GI tract more easily, which can lead to enteritis, colitis and systemic spread to other organs, including the lungs. 

Spiegel and his colleagues decided to see how PPI use is related to COVID-19 infections. They surveyed online a nationally representative sample of Americans in the period from May 3 to June 24, 2020.

Participants answered questions related to gastrointestinal symptoms, their use of PPIs, and COVID-19 test results. They also answered questions about histamine-2 receptor agonists, also known as H2 blockers, which are utilized to treat similar conditions as PPIs but that do not decrease stomach acid as much.

86,602 participants completed the survey; 53,130 of them said they had felt abdominal discomfort, heartburn, acid reflux, or regurgitation. The survey participants were also asked about PPI and H2RA use.

6.4% tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. 

The researchers found that those who took PPIs once a day were twice as likely to get a positive COVID-19 test result than those who did not take the drugs.

Contact hurt.com if you experienced any side effects after using PPI.

Source: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/933645

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